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Robert Laffont
EAN : 9782221093214
Shaping : BROCHE
Pages : 288
Size : 153 x 240 mm
Dostoïevski in Manhattan

Release date : 10/01/2002

The end of the Cold War did not mean the end of History, but the beginning of the new era. The tragic events of the 11th of September dramatically confirm the triumph of Nihilism.Indeed, ancestral traditions and beliefs are dying, and two thirds of humanity...

The end of the Cold War did not mean the end of History, but the beginning of the new era. The tragic events of the 11th of September dramatically confirm the triumph of Nihilism.Indeed, ancestral traditions and beliefs are dying, and two thirds of humanity are excluded from Euro-American prosperity. Four billion human beings are living in economic, social and moral instability: the Promise Land of Nihilism.Russia has been testing this out for three centuries with regard to her own situation: her ancestral morality hasn't progressed and the extent of her Europeanisation is still uncertain. Only Russian literature has got the measure of the nihilistic phenomenon, from Oneguin to Raskolnikov.What is Nihilism? The notion of Nihilism is directly connected to cruelty: it's practice, legitimisation and acceptance. Nihilism is a post ideological concept; it speculates on power, is understood as a capacity for nuisance: 'Destroy!' is its slogan. Nihilism is harmful physically and psychologically: its fundamental principles are corruption, terror and destruction. The Nihilist does not care anymore about great ideals, does not ask 'why?' or 'what for?'. He dares to and asks 'why not?': everything is permitted.The nihilistic challenge is as old as Occidental civilisation. And the resistance to Nihilism characterises civilisation. Today, after two thousand years of maturation, Nihilism challenges the whole planet. Political courage, endurance and ethics are the only ways to fight against the eternal temptation of Nihilism.

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EAN : 9782221093214
Shaping : BROCHE
Pages : 288
Size : 153 x 240 mm
Robert Laffont