Lisez! icon: Search engine
Robert Laffont
EAN : 9782221238691
Shaping : BROCHE
Pages : 330
Size : 153 x 240 mm
Novelty
Immigration

Release date : 19/11/2020
Without mincing his words, and with strong data and his extensive political and ministerial experience for support, Patrick Stefanini tackles immigration, a controversial subject in France in particular. He comes to an enlightening realization that should serve as a warning to us all.
Since the start of the 21st century, France has had to face a new and powerful wave of immigration. After stabilizing in the last quarter of the 20th century, the percentage of immigrants in France has grown from 7.5% in 2000 to 9.7% in 2018. It is a phenomenon too... Since the start of the 21st century, France has had to face a new and powerful wave of immigration. After stabilizing in the last quarter of the 20th century, the percentage of immigrants in France has grown from 7.5% in 2000 to 9.7% in 2018. It is a phenomenon too often minimized by observers and treated by many in a way that is too controversial and popularity-seeking.
Patrick Stefanini has devoted a large portion of his career to this issue, first as the Deputy Director of the Department of Aliens and Cross-border Traffic within the Ministry of the Interior between 1988 and 1991, then as the Secretary General of the Inter-ministerial Committee for the Management of Immigration between 2005 and 2009 and First Secretary General of the new Ministry of Immigration, Integration, National Identity and Codevelopment created in 2007 by Nicolas Sarkozy.
In this book, Stefanini shows how immigration to France has changed dramatically over the past twenty years. Its main driving force is no longer family reunification, and it largely escapes the control of public authorities. The same is true for demands for asylum, which have tripled since 2007 and which France is having more difficulty controlling compared to other European nations. In the end, the chosen immigration policy, as promoted by Nicolas Sarkozy and continued by his successors despite their positions and speeches, has had unbalanced effects: it has contributed more to the growth of economic immigration and that of students, which was one of its goals, but it has not reduced family or humanitarian immigration as much as expected.

Unfortunately, this problem is affecting France at a time when its abilities to welcome foreigners have become insufficient due to mass unemployment levels, making it difficult to support new immigrants. Whether it comes to housing, school, employment, or poverty, all the indicators of France’s openness, which the author analyzes in this work, have “turned red.” This finding is not aimed at incriminating new immigrants, but rather to emphasize, as no one has yet done, that France, a downgraded middle power in both Europe and the world, can no longer be open. For want of controlling immigration and economic downturn, France has left its social model go to ruin.
 
Read more
Read less
EAN : 9782221238691
Shaping : BROCHE
Pages : 330
Size : 153 x 240 mm
Robert Laffont